IPv6 the topic for special edition of the Linx Internet Magazine

The London Internet Exchange (LINX) has announced the publication of a special IPv6 edition of the Internet magazine, HotLINX, available for download now from the LINX website.

Current estimates are that there is as little as 11% remaining of the total number of IPv4 addresses, which could be exhausted in as little as two years. In contrast, IPv6 is an addressing scheme that uses 128 bits that allows for a total of 340 billion billion billion billion unique addresses.

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What is IPv6, what are its conventions, features and advantages

This article is to explain what is IPv6, how does it differ from IPV4, what was the necessity to come up with IPv6, a basic IPv6 address and its compositions, some conventions of IPv6, some features of IPv6 and also the advantages of using IPv6 over IPv4.

What is IPv6 and what was the need for its introduction?

IPv6 is a new IP addressing scheme. It is set to replace the IPv4 IP addressing scheme that is currently in place. You should be familiar with 169.254.0.16 type of IP address which is essentially an IPv4 structure for an IP address with 32 bits (four sections of eight bits). The primary reason to bring in a new addressing scheme is because there is expected to be a shortage of the public IP addresses that is given to companies, web hosts and also individuals. While the current IPv4 address schemes can provide 17 million useful addresses (approximately), the new IPv6 format is expected to provide at least 18 trillion useful addresses.

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Interview with Randy Bush

Randy Bush, of Internet Initiative Japan Inc. (IIJ) in Japan, discusses IPv6 deployment. It includes practical information on the challenges, costs and planning of rolling out IPv6.



Have fun watching and stay tuned for more interviews from RIPE NCC!

IPv6 becomes the essential backbone protocol for next-generation networking

The European Commission recently set an IPv6 target adoption rate of 25 percent by 2010, and the chairman of the Asia Pacific Network Information Centre predicted that all IPv4 addresses will be depleted by 2011, forcing wide-scale IPv6 adoption. In June 2008, the U.S. federal government requires that all its executive agencies add IPv6 to their network backbones. A number of Internet powerhouses, such as Google and Alta Vista, have now deployed IPv6 accessible websites. Operating systems, such as the latest versions of Microsoft Windows, include IPv6 support.

IPv6 boasts improved network reliability, lower costs and improved security in addition to its vastly expanded addressing and routing capabilities (achieved by increasing the address length from 32 to 128 bits). While the benefits of IPv6 are apparent, performance management will becomes inherently more difficult as a single IPv6 subnet is as large as the entire Internet today.

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IPv6 the topic for special edition of the LINX Internet magazine, HotLINX

The London Internet Exchange (LINX) has announced the publication of a special IPv6 edition of the Internet magazine, HotLINX, available for download now from the LINX website.

Current estimates are that there is as little as 11% remaining of the total number of IPv4 addresses, which could be exhausted in as little as two years. In contrast, IPv6 is an addressing scheme that uses 128 bits that allows for a total of 340 billion billion billion billion unique addresses. However, while the advantages in making the transition from the current IPv4 infrastructure seem clear, it does require careful management to ensure that all elements of the move to IPv6 are transparent to end users. Key industry professional have beeen interviewed to offer their views on a range of IPv6 addressing issues and on what should be done to encourage a more rapid deployment of IPv6 in the future.

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Fix6 receives IPv6 Enabled WWW Logo!

ipv6_enabled_original_size_green1_thumbnailThe IPv6 Forum IPv6 Enabled Logo program objective is to accelerate deployment of IPv6. The goal of this program is to increase user confidence by demonstrating that IPv6 is available now and is ready to be used.


The IPv6 Enabled WWW Logo Program is the first one to be released. Its objective is to encourage adoption of IPv6 on the millions of web sites (WWW) at enterprises, Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and private users helping them to test and check their proper IPv6 readiness and adoption.


As you can see on the sidebar we from Fix6.net have recieved our Logo. And we are now “Officially IPv6 Enabled”