The European Commission recently set an IPv6 target adoption rate of 25 percent by 2010, and the chairman of the Asia Pacific Network Information Centre predicted that all IPv4 addresses will be depleted by 2011, forcing wide-scale IPv6 adoption. In June 2008, the U.S. federal government requires that all its executive agencies add IPv6 to their network backbones. A number of Internet powerhouses, such as Google and Alta Vista, have now deployed IPv6 accessible websites. Operating systems, such as the latest versions of Microsoft Windows, include IPv6 support.

IPv6 boasts improved network reliability, lower costs and improved security in addition to its vastly expanded addressing and routing capabilities (achieved by increasing the address length from 32 to 128 bits). While the benefits of IPv6 are apparent, performance management will becomes inherently more difficult as a single IPv6 subnet is as large as the entire Internet today.

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